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Statistical Physics and Applications

The activity in statistical physics at LPT-ENS has been historically related to the study of disordered systems, whose physical properties are largely influenced by the presence of heterogeneous, quenched interactions. In addition to our core activity around disordered systems, the Statistical Physics and Application team is also working on a large variety of issues, ranging from abstract aspects of mathematical physics to applications to condensed matter, biology and computer science.

Conformal field theories (CFT), integrability and random geometry are some of the mathematical structures studied at LPT-ENS that arise in many modern applications of statistical physics, with applications to 2d phase transitions, to critical quantum systems, to random planar curves and interfaces... Our works encompass in particular the development of logarithmic CFTs, the physical understanding of planar random curves generated by stochastic Schramm- Loewner evolution. Stochastic integrability has been recently studied in the context of growth models in the KPZ class in close contact with similar developments in mathematics.

Disordered systems are still a very important part of theoretical statistical physics at LPT-ENS. Concepts such as ergodicity breaking and many equilibrium states, crucial to the understanding of e.g. pinning, shocks and avalanches in non-equilibrium dynamics, the glass transition, jamming and constrained or activated slow dynamics, are still actively developed in the lab, and have also found deep applications to other domains, in particular, in computer science (optimization problems and quantum computing) and random graph theory.

Understanding the principles governing the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of quantum many-body systems, via approaches ranging from exact results in CFT’s to numerical solutions, is another important aspect of our current activity. We study in particular the fundamental properties of quantum noise and quantum trajectories, such as in open systems that are being continuously monitored. We also investigate scenarios in which non-equilibrium physics, in particular the interplay of drive and dissipation, can be used as a resource to realize exotic many-body states such as high-temperature superconductivity in condensed matter or long-lived multipartite entanglement in cavity quantum electrodynamics.

Biological systems pose new challenges for statistical mechanics compared to non-animate materials, as they involve interactions on many scales and are intrinsically out of equilibrium. Our aim is to describe the emergent properties that lead to the remarkable precision in the functioning of living systems, a challenge made possible by the emergence of increasingly precise and reproducible experiments. Applications of our researches range from neural and immune systems to proteins, from development to evolution and animal behaviour.

For more information about the ongoing research:

ARON Camille

ARON Camille

(Out-of-equilibrium many-body phenomena in statistical physics, Condensed-matter physics, and quantum optics)

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BERNARD Denis

BERNARD Denis

(Statistical physics and mathematical physics)

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JACOBSEN Jesper

JACOBSEN Jesper

(Conformal field theory, Exactly solvable models)

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Le DOUSSAL Pierre

Le DOUSSAL Pierre

(Condensed Matter and Statistical Physics)

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MONASSON Remi

MONASSON Remi

(Statistical physics, learning and inference & applications to biological systems)

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SEMERJIAN Guilhem

SEMERJIAN Guilhem

(Statistical mechanics, Disordered systems, Optimisation problems)

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WALCZAK Aleksandra

WALCZAK Aleksandra

(Statistical biophysics)

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WIESE Kay

WIESE Kay

(Disordered systems and functional renormalization)

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ZAMPONI Francesco

ZAMPONI Francesco

(Theory of glasses, granulars, and other amorphous solids, Agent-based models for macroeconomy, Quantum disordered systems, Quantum algorithms, Non-equilibrum statistical mechanics)

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